Disney`s Frozen

Disney’sFrozen

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Disney’sFrozen

Section1

Inprevious animation productions, princesses have portrayed asrepresentatives of a gender that is in dire need of being saved bymembers of the male gender. This has been the case with Mulan,Cinderellaand more recently Tangled.In Tangled,Rapunzel represents women as perceived in traditional cultures. Assuch, Tangled tells of the story of women in ancient days whose liveswere confined to carrying out repetitive domestic roles and denied ofany right to voice their views.

Frozen,on the other hand, is feminist. This animation strongly promotesfeminist perceptions and whole-heartedly delves into contemporarygender issues. In previous movies, princesses were the onlycharacters accorded fully developed feminine characters such that allother female characters were subdued by cultural inclinations.

Section2

Inaddition, Frozen,delves and more so seeks to offer explanations as to the problemsfacing women thus exposing them to adverse societal pressures. Moreso, this movie attempts at dealing with these common societalpressures in an approachable way, which is indeed quite entertaining.The primary source of conflict in this movie stems from Queen Esla, awoman with powerful mystical features that she is unable to control(Buck &amp Lee, 2013). She has the ability to form ice in magicalproportions. When Esla was younger, she enjoyed playing with hersister and more so using these powers to make fun of her. At onetime, she unintentionally caused harm to her sister, which led herparents to ban her from using them even when playing with her sister.As an adult, her powers manifested themselves publicly causing thesociety to banish her to the mountains whereby she caused an ice Age,which was left hurting the society that banished her.

Section3

Onecan argue that when Esla is forcibly asked to leave town and into themountains, readers find her asking questions with regard to herpowers (Buck &amp Lee, 2013). Here it seems to that, she experiencesa sexual awakening. She thinks to herself, “I like my powers withwhich I control ice and I do not take too kindly of anyone asking meto bottle them up” (Buck &amp Lee, 2013). She goes on to live inher own little world, an icy house, icy clothes and more so sings anamazing song defining her personality. This is a time when she comesto terms with herself, as she understands how it truly feels to befree.

Section4

However,this victory presents some unlikely consequences. She is away fromall that is dear to her, the society in which she grew up in, heradorable sister and more so, that world that banished her is reelingfrom her rage, an Ice age. It thus dawns on her that she is betteroff alone in her own little icy world.

Section4

Thisis the case in our society today, based on family backgrounds, soyoung people are expected to act in a given manner similar to what isexpected of the family background. This is what may be inhibits theseyoung people from understanding themselves and appear to be rebels asthey try to conform with people who seem to appreciate them. Thesepeople may have ill intentions and cause them to be the opposite ofwhat society expects. As such, young people should be independent tounderstand their own personality to integrate themselves in societyin a positive manner. This movie is an entertaining way to delve intoissues on sex and gender and is a must watch.

References

Buck,C. &amp Lee, J. (2013). Frozen.Retrievedonline from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXAQnk-BP-U