Sexuality among the Youths

Sexualityamong the Youths

Sexualityamong the Youths

Sexamong the youths is highly debated topic given the fact thatirresponsible sex subject young people to a wide range of problems,including sexually transmitted diseases and psychological problems. Ichose this topic because I have an urge to understand how theincrease in access to information (both correct and wrong) about sexis subjecting the youths to confusion. For example, research hasshown that an increase in the use of internet to source informationabout sex has enhanced the risk of sexual harassment among the youths(Wolak, Finkehor, Mitchell &amp Ybarra, 2008). The most interestingpart of youths’ sexuality is their exposure to online pornography,which motivates them to engage in sexual intercourse at a tender age.

Mitchell,J., Wolak, J. &amp Finkelhor, D. (2006). Trends in youth reports ofsexual solicitations, harassment and unwanted exposure to pornographyon the internet. Journalof Adolescent Health,40, 117-126.

Theauthors of this article evaluated the relationship between youths’exposure to online pornography and unwanted sexual solicitation aswell as harassment. This was accomplished by conducting across-sectional study among the internet users between the age of 10and 17 years, with the objective of evaluating the effect of theinternet on their sexual experiences. The researchers identified thatthe risk of encountering unwanted sexual solicitation after exposureto online pornographic material in a period of five years varies withthe age of the study participants, gender, household income, andrace. The authors also identified that a high rate of exposure toonline pornography occurred at the age of 10-12 years. This can beexplained by the fact that the youths in this stage of developmentare trying to discover their sexuality, but go to online sources ofinformation because they have one to educate them about their sexualdevelopment at a tender age. Although the incidents of unwantedsexual solicitation decline with age for both male and femalesubjects, youths from poor families and the minority groups do notexperience this decrease. The authors conclude that the generaldecline in cases of unwanted sexual solicitation is mainly caused bylaw enforcement and the effect of education.

Boies,C., Knudson, G. &amp Young, J. (2004). The internet, sex, andyouths: Implications for sexual development. SexualAddiction and Compulsivity,11, 343-363.

Thepurpose of this article is to review the previous research articlesthat addressed the effect of internet activities on the psychologicalhealth of the youths. Some of the key internet sexual activitiesexplored in the article include online socialization, sex education,and online entertainment among the young adults and adolescents. Theauthors introduce the topic by informing that the main purpose of theuse of internet among the youths is communication, but they engage inonline sexual activities out of curiosity. The authors found out thatparent’s reluctance to discuss sexual matters with their youthshave increased the tendency on the young generation to use thereadily available internet sources of information to learn about sex.Unfortunately, much of this information is misleading and the youthsuse it to shape their patterns of behavior as well as sexual beliefs.In addition, most of the educational materials found in the internetfail to address the key concepts of safe sex, including the use ofcontraceptives, commitment in relationships, and considering thepotential consequences of engaging in sexual intercourse. Frequentuse of the internet as a source of information about sex results inaddiction that in turn leads to causes psychological problems, suchas social depression, low self esteem, and a feeling of isolation.

Aspy,B., Vesely, K., Oman, F., Rodine, S., Marshall, L., Fluhr, J. &ampMcLeroy, K. (2006). Youth-parent communication and youth sexualbehavior: Implications for physicians. FamilyMedicine,38 (7), 500-504.

Thepurpose of the article was to explore the effect of conversationbetween youths and their parents as well as their relationship onsexual behavior. The researchers explored this phenomenon byinterviewing youths and parents from 1350 households that wererandomly selected from Oklahoma City. Some of the key variableaddressed in the study includes the parent-youth discussions aboutbirth control, delaying sexual intercourse, wrong sexual behavior,and prevention of sexually transmitted disease. The researchersidentified that youths from families that experienced positiverelationship between parents and their youths did not engage in earlysex, while those who had already engaged in sexual intercoursepracticed safe sex. This suggests that the tendency of parents toengage their youth in conversations about sexual behavior ispositively associated with positive perceptions and beliefs about sexamong youths. In addition, the youth-parent communication about sexmatters is positively associated with abstinence. Althoughparent-youth communication is associated with positive sexualbehavior among the youths, the authors conclude that suchcommunication should be agreed upon by both participants (parent andthe youth) for it to result in positive outcomes. This is because aneffective conversation is determined by frequency as well as theintensity of values discussed by participants.

Campos,D. (2002). Contemporaryeducation issues: Sex, youth, and sex education.Washington, DC: Library of Congress.

Theauthor divided the book into nine chapters, each of them focusing ona different sub-topic. However, the overall subject of the book issex education among the youths. Campos described sex education as thepractice of teaching youths about different aspects of sex, includingsex as part of life, opposite sex, or sexual behavior. The mainobjective of providing sex education to youths is to help themdevelop positive beliefs and perceptions about sex and reduce theirengagement in risky sexual behavior. The sex education programsprovided to youths should be adjusted with time to ensure that itaddresses the current topics. For example, some of the contemporaryissues of youth’s sexuality at the moment include sex orientation,sexual violence against the young generation, and sexuality amongyouths with disabilities. A comprehensive program for sex educationgive the historical perspective of the contemporary issues and showyouths both sides of sexually in order to help them make informedchoices. In the past, sex education programs were provided to youthsin response to the increase abortion, sexually transmitted disease,and teenage pregnancies. However, this practice has been replacedwith a preventive approach where youths are now given sex educationbefore they engage in unsafe sex. Helping the youths to acquire acomfortable and a positive attitude about sex is the only way to helpthem live a healthy lifestyle.

Hasler,N. (2010). Anuncensored guide to your body, sex, and safety.San Francisco, CA: Orange Avenue Publishing.

Hasleraddresses the topic of sexuality among the teens in a total of ninesub-topics subtopics. The author introduces the teens into sexeducation by providing a discussion of how the body functions. Thedifference between the male and female sexuality is mainly caused byeffects of varying types of hormones. Teenage is a crucialdevelopmental stage at which sexual identification occurs.Unfortunately, inaccessibility of correct information about sex amongthe teens increases their risk of engaging in unsafe and immoralpractices, such as masturbation. The author tries to fill the gap oflack of comprehensive information about teen’s sexuality byintroducing them to different sex styles, what they should expectfrom sex, and how to engage in safe sexual practices. The authorimplies that understanding and appreciating one’s sexuality is theonly effective way of helping the teens in adopting healthy sexualbehavior. In addition, the author addresses the myths held by teensabout their sexuality. For example, the shape and the size of sexualorgans and body parts (such as breasts) may subject the teens to therisk of suffering from depression in case they perceive that they areunlovable. Discussing about sex with teens in an open way clears allthe myths and guides and introduces them to sexuality with the rightbeliefs and perceptions.

References

Aspy,B., Vesely, K., Oman, F., Rodine, S., Marshall, L., Fluhr, J. &ampMcLeroy, K. (2006). Youth-parent communication and youth sexualbehavior: Implications for physicians. FamilyMedicine,38 (7), 500-504.

Boies,C., Knudson, G. &amp Young, J. (2004). The internet, sex, andyouths: Implications for sexual development. SexualAddiction and Compulsivity,11, 343-363.

Campos,D. (2002). Contemporaryeducation issues: Sex, youth, and sex education.Washington, DC: Library of Congress.

Hasler,N. (2010). Anuncensored guide to your body, sex, and safety.San Francisco, CA: Orange Avenue Publishing.

Mitchell,J., Wolak, J. &amp Finkelhor, D. (2006). Trends in youth reports ofsexual solicitations, harassment and unwanted exposure to pornographyon the internet. Journalof Adolescent Health,40, 117-126.

Wolak,J. Finkehor, D., Mitchell, J. &amp Ybarra, L. (2008). Onlinepredators and their victims. AmericanPsychologist,63 (2), 111-128. DOI: 10.1037/0003-066X.63.2.111